Image by apefrance from Pixabay

(On the way home from school pick up with his two kids following )

You’re an idiot you don’t belong on the road and you don’t pay road tax (argument spoiler; neither do electric cars).

You’re an idiot, you should get out of the way (argument spoiler; place those most…

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What kind of football coach would teach a kid to catch? A goalkeeping coach.

True, but think wider.

Why would a football coach teach a kid to catch? Because it teaches the kid to track a moving object. And in time, with the right skills in place, move to effect the moving object, in this case, catch it.

How does a football coach teach a kit to catch? I’m glad you asked.

Next time you see a young kid flinch, duck or turn their back when a football bounces towards their face, think. What kind of football coach teaches a kid to catch?

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Image by falco from Pixabay

Risk slowing down progress.

Ridicule and humiliation are risk management tools. Ridicule the problem and it is likely that it may just feel less important and go away. For those in the group who are out of synch, humiliation teaches what it looks like when we don’t comply.

Coaches beware.

Dynamic tension might not feel like the progress we want but it just might be the progress we need.

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Who learns quicker? The kid who wants to hit the skin off the ball. Or the kid who watches and tracks the ball.

Coaching is seen as a way to speed things up. And that might just be confusing for a youth coach.

Toni Nadal, noticed something different when he threw a ball at his niece Rafa Nadal. He moved towards the ball, the other kids just stood there. Rafa Nadal was watching, tracking the ball, and then deciding when to move. The others had no decision to make, they just waited.

The role of a youth coach is to develop context, not speed.

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Simon A Harling

Simon A Harling

Coach, speaker, blogger on fitness, coaching & personal leadership https://linktr.ee/SimonHarling